Easter Eggs You Might Have Missed In Season 3 of ‘The Boys’

This article was originally published on worldtravelling.com and has been republished here with permission.

The Boys is set in a world where people with superpowers, known as supes, are revered as heroes by the general populace and work for a significant company known as Vought International, which markets and profits from them. Most are haughty, self-centered, and corrupt when they don’t put on their heroic facades. The Seven, the top superhero team in Vought, and the Boys, a squad of vigilantes out to destroy Vought and its phony superheroes, are the two main subjects of the series. Season 3 was dropped on Friday, June 13 with a total of 8 episodes. Here we have gathered you all the Easter eggs found in season three. We must warn you, there are major spoilers ahead.

The season three premiere features the same statue of Soldier Boy from last season.

In season two, episode seven, Homelander (Antony Starr) and Stormfront (Aya Cash) spoke during a rally outside Vought Tower, and a brief shot of the same figure was also shown. The statue also foreshadows the eagerly anticipated third-season appearance of Soldier Boy played by Jensen Ackles.

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The fallen Soldier Boy statue that is briefly visible in a scene from “Dawn of the Seven” is a parody of DC Comics’ “Justice League.” We all know Jensen from the WB/CW hit show Supernatural, where he played Dean Winchester. Supernatural was also created by writer and director Eric Kripke. It’s family business.

The supe named Termite, who was briefly seen in season one, returns at the start of season three.

Character Termite is featured in seasons one and three of “The Boys.” A parody of Marvel’s Ant-Man, Termite has the ability to contract to a minute size. In season 1, when Butcher (Karl Urban) and Hughie (Jack Quaid) visited a covert super erotic club, Termite (played by Mike Donis) appeared right away.

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In season three, we can see the character at a penthouse party. In one of the show’s most outlandish moments, Brett Geddes’ character Termite shrinks and enters a man’s private parts to give him pleasure. However, he unintentionally sneezes, Termite kills the man by reverting back to his usual size.

Music from Billy Joel, one of Hughie’s favorite musicians, is featured in the season three premiere.

In “The Boys,” episode one of season three, Jack Quaid and Erin Moriarty can be seen together. Billy Joel’s popular song “Uptown Girl” is played at the episode’s climax and throughout a montage of Hughie and Annie getting ready in the morning. Previous episodes have featured songs from the artist like “Pressure” and “You’re Only Human (Second Wind).”

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Hughie Campbell and Annie January, aka Starlight, began as strangers, became romantic, were almost enemies, and then formed a flirtatious relationship that fans could genuinely support. Now they are everyone’s favorite couple, and each time they share a scene it’s a spectacle.

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Hughie’s dad makes a brief appearance via video after being put in protective custody with the CIA in season one.

Hugh Campbell is portrayed by legendary English actor Simon Pegg. In episode seven of season one, Hughie’s father was placed in protective custody to keep him out of harm’s way as the Boys’ struggle with Vought grew more intense.

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In the comics, along with Hughie’s mother, Daphne, Alexander Fergus Campbell dwells in Auchterladle, Scotland. Hughie considers the Campbells to be his true parents despite the fact that he was actually adopted and has never indicated a desire to find his birth parents. In Dear Becky, it is revealed that Alexander passed away in 2018, a year after his wife.

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Hughie has a framed photo of Annie on his desk at the Federal Bureau of Superhuman Affairs (FBSA).

Jack Quaid portrays Hughie Campbell. In the season two finale, Hughie joined the Federal Bureau of Superhuman Affairs (FBSA), which is run by Victoria Neuman, a congresswoman (Claudia Doumit).

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By the end of the season three premiere, he discovers that she is not only a supe herself, but she is none other than the infamous “Head-Popper” who murdered Susan Raynor, Jonah Vogelbaum. As the Director of the FBSA, her facade, Congresswoman Neuman helps make the world a safer place. The bad apples among the supes have been removed thanks to her agreement with Vought, leaving more people safe at home.

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Victoria has a framed photo of herself and her daughter, Zoe, in her office.

Season three episode one of “The Boys” tells more about Victoria’s past, including her improbable relationship with Stan Edgar from Vought (Giancarlo Esposito). Victoria was initially given the name Nadia. She spent her childhood as an orphan at Red River, a community for families who choose not to care for Supes.

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She was transported to Red River soon after this incident to learn how to control her powers, but she always ended up killing her adoptive families. Stan Edgar eventually adopted her, gave her a new name, destroyed all records of her crimes, and vowed to protect her at all times.

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Mother’s Milk gives his daughter Janine a Flava Flav clock on a chain for her birthday.

In “The Boys,” episode one of season three, from left to right, we see Mother’s Milk, Monique, and Janine. Flava Flav posing in 1989 is on the right. The rapper’s distinctive adornment is a huge clock.

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Flava Flav claimed in a 2011 interview with Vanity Fair that a friend had dared him to start wearing the clock around his neck. The object then started to take on a lot more metaphorical meaning. He explained that he wore the clock because it stood for the idea that time is what matters most in life. Live every second to the fullest.

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Victoria name-drops three supes from the comics: Cold Snap, Stacker, and Airburst.

Victoria Neuman mentions Cold Snap, Stacker, and Starburst. The first two are members of the G-Force and Starburst of G-Wiz, two divisions of the G-Men in the comics. However, in the TV show universe those supes are B-listers. At the Federal Bureau of Superhuman Affairs, where their responsibility is to oversee Superhuman activity, Victoria collaborates closely with Hughie Campbell.

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They make an effort to control superheroes like Termite and, when necessary, arrest some of them. Stan Edgar and the public appear to appreciate Victoria’s efforts at the FBSA because she is a very well-known person. She polices the supe situation.

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The Boys finally move into their headquarters from the comics, New York City’s Flatiron Building.

The group previously conducted business from dirty basements in “The Boys’ first two seasons. They ultimately acquire a better place with more room to maneuver in season three. More than a century after its construction, the Flatiron Building is still at the cutting edge. Its original shape and Renaissance style make it one of the most easily identifiable buildings in New York City.

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His original name soon gave way to his nickname. The Fuller Building thus became the Flatiron. Its iron shape logically led New Yorkers. The Boys get to set camp at an historical building whether they care or not.

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Supersonic, formerly known as Drummer Boy, makes his debut this season as Starlight’s ex.

In the comics, Annie and Alex, aka Drummer Boy, first met in the youth organization Capes for Christ. On the Capes for Christ tour in the past, Alex/Supersonic (Miles Gaston Villanueva) dated Starlight in the television series. He was a former member of the all-supe boy band Super-Sweet, however, he changed his name to Supersonic after going solo.

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When Supersonic participates on the reality series “American Hero” with the aim of joining The Seven, he re-enters her life. Since he and Starlight had known each other since they were teenagers, they were able to swiftly rekindle their connection rather quickly.

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“American Hero” finalist Silver Kincaid is a character from the comics.

The first supe in the series to don a hijab is Silver (Jasmin Husain). Her superhuman abilities are telepathy and telekinesis, and she is a professional rescuer. She comes from Birmingham, United Kingdom. She appears as a contender on American Hero, a reality show hosted by Starlight where supes compete to become members of The Seven.

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The character is very different in the comics. Issue 23 of volume 4 is where Silver made its debut. She was abducted by the leader of the G-Men, John Godolkin, when she was only a little girl and raised to join his supe team.

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Queen Maeve being Butcher’s informant is a nod to the comics.

In the third season, Queen Maeve (Dominique McElligott) gives Butcher inside information, such as the location of Termite in the season premiere. She also provides him with a brief compound V sample, an unproven medication that gives users powers for an entire day. Because Butcher and Maeve both despise Homelander and believe they have access to a weapon that can kill the supreme being, they partner together.

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In the comics, Maeve is identified as the Boys’ informant who planted bugs in the Seven’s headquarters in volume seven, issue 46. Maeve hates Homelander much like her TV program counterpart does.

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Butcher has a dog-shaped jar that seems to be a nod to his beloved dog Terror and his home country.

The UK flag is shown on the Butcher’s dog Terror’s collar, which is also draped around the animal’s back. Turns out Billy Butcher is a Londoner. However, the real-life dog of Butcher first appeared in a season one flashback then reappeared in the present in season two.

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Terror has only sporadic appearances in the show, despite being a frequently occurring and prominent character in the comics. Co-creator of the program Eric Kripke claimed that the main reason for Terror’s absences was the challenge of dealing with dogs in addition to everything else that was going on with the show.

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Butcher and Homelander’s tense, face-to-face sit-down is reminiscent of a similar one that occurred between Robert De Niro and Al Pacino’s characters in “Heat.”

Homelander visits Butcher at his flat in “The Boys” episode one, and they decide to fight to the death after they regain their vigor. The most memorable scene in the 1995 crime movie “Heat” occurred at a diner between De Niro and Pacino’s characters. The two came to the realization that despite being very different people, they have some things in common.

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The men also make it clear that if they get in one another’s way, they will not hesitate to fight. Homelander is the leader of The Seven and the archenemy of Billy Butcher, the leader of The Boys.

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In a recurring theme, Hughie gets covered in blood in the season three premiere.

Every season begins with a scene in which Hughie finds himself unexpectedly covered in blood. In the first episode of the season, it happened while Hughie was holding the hands of Robin (Jess Salgueiro), his then-girlfriend, when A-Train plowed through her and killed her. Hughie was covered in CIA director Susan Raynor’s (Jennifer Esposito) intestines in the season two opener after Victoria caused her to lose her cool.

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Hughie again finds himself in Neuman’s line of fire in season three. He observes Victoria murdering Tony in an alleyway. Tony and Victoria were once roommates in a home for supe kids.

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Billy Zane has a cameo this season as former Church of the Collective leader Alastair Adana in a TV movie.

The Deep (Chace Crawford) stars in the film “Not Without My Dolphin,” which is based on the supe’s best-selling biography “Deeper.” He’s a member of The Seven and a former member of the Church of the Collective.

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Despite being a type of religion, little is known about the doctrines. The Church appears to worship the Space Spores, who built an Ark and journeyed a trillion light years before reaching planet Earth, according to what is seen in the film Not Without My Dolphin. Earlier in season two, Zane had an appearance on a billboard for the movie “Terminal Beauty 3.”

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Butcher’s desktop photo is an image of Terror.

At the beginning of episode two, Butcher and Ryan (Cameron Crovetti) have a video chat. Behind the boy, you can see the face of Terror as the background image. Butcher’s sweet side peeps through; he adores his English Bulldog Terror.

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Billy and Becca were Terror’s first homeowners when they were a happy couple. Billy taught him to hump anything on demand at some point during his period. Otherwise he is a good boy, except when he discreetly pees on the legs of the Homelander, the Ultimate Supe. All members of the Boys get on well with the lovable English Bulldog.

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The choreographer helping Supersonic with his moves at the soundcheck for Homelander’s annual birthday spectacular is the real-life choreographer for “The Boys.”

Supersonic’s dance moves for his popular song “You’ve Got a License to Drive (Me Crazy)” are seen being assisted by choreographer Amy Wright, the actual choreographer for “The Boys.”

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Supersonic agreed to perform one of his songs even though he didn’t want to for Homelander’s birthday event because he was concerned that not doing so would harm his chances of getting into The Seven. Starlight revealed the truth about what life would be like for him if he joined The Seven, and it made him feel as though all the work he had put into getting here had been in vain.

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Mother’s Milk has the magnets on his fridge neatly arranged.

Based on the colors of the magnets, they have been arranged in three columns. This is the outcome of MM’s OCD and propensity for doing things in threes. Annie had noticed in episode four of season two.

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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder is an issue for Mother’s Milk, who acknowledges it. Milk still checks the stove’s burners three times a night because he still feels that if he doesn’t, Soldier Boy will come back and kill the rest of his family. Milk was traumatized by the death of his grandfather, who was killed when Soldier Boy threw a Mercedes-Benz through his family’s home.

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The byline in a newspaper clipping about Soldier Boy is a nod to a “Boys” crewmember.

Adam Bocknek and Janet Chandler were the authors of the article about Soldier Boy apprehending a car thief in Harlem. Bocknek serves as the second assistant director for the program in real life. Season three reveals the role Soldier Boy played in Mother’s Milk history.

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Additionally, MM is driven by an obsession to murder Soldier Boy, which drives him to try things that he knows will fail, like fighting Soldier Boy with his bare hands. With significant exceptions like Starlight and Kimiko, the first of whom has formed an honest friendship, he despises Soldier Boy and supes in general.

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A-Train gives a shout-out to the real-life costume designer of “The Boys.”

In episode two, A-Train offers to get his image rebranded and says to Ashley: “LJ even helped me rework the outfit. For the culture, of course.” Ashley forbids A-Train from wearing the new suit, but he nevertheless does so later during Homelander’s birthday celebration.

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Laura Jean Shannon is the head of the supes’ suits in both the universe of “The Boys” and real life. She also designs the actors’ costumes. This is the third occasion that we see the production team playing the part of their own job in the fictitious universe. It crosses the lines between real and imaginary.

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The whereabouts of Madelyn Stillwell’s son, Teddy, are finally revealed.

Teddy was present when Butcher planted a bomb in his mother Madelyn’s (Elisabeth Shue) home shortly after her passing in the season one finale. Teddy was discovered alive 17 miles away, as was reported in a news story from the season two premiere.

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In episode two of season three, Hughie meets a 3-year-old Teddy at The Red River Institute. Teddy’s ability to teleport is revealed, which clarifies how he left the house and avoided the bomb blast. Due to Compound V, Teddy is able to teleport from one location to another almost instantly. He can teleport his clothes with him.

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Episode two subtly sets up the upcoming college-focused spin-off series.

A “Boys” spin-off show is subtly established in season three, episode two. A picture of a 17-year-old girl named Marie M. may be seen as the woman from Red River shows Hughie children in the system. Jaz Sinclair, who starred in “Chilling Adventures of Sabrina,” will be the show’s executive producer and appear in the untitled “Boys” spin-off.

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The series will primarily focus on young supes with extraordinary abilities at a college owned by Vought. The college spinoff started filming in Toronto two months ago. The working title is Varsity and the showrunners are Michele Fazekas and Tara Butters.

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Hughie’s laptop background image is a photo of him and Annie.

A candid picture of him and Annie can be seen when Hughie watches footage of young Victoria, then known as Nadia, meeting Stan for the first time. In season three, Hughie is in a strong and stable relationship with Annie, they are also in a public relationship.

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The scene where Hughie persuades Mother’s Milk to allow Annie to join them on their journey to learn more about the former superhero Liberty is incredibly wholesome. When “We Didn’t Start The Fire” comes on the radio in the car, Hughie is delighted to hear Annie sing along while expressing her admiration for Joel.

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A poster at the annual firearm convention and exposition features a subtle nod to a “Boys” crew member.

You can see a billboard for a weapon with a female motif named GalGear by Vought when Butcher attends Gunpowder’s speech at the occasion. The remark on the billboard is from Joelle Craven, who worked this season as a first assistant, art director and graphic designer in real life.

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Again, another member of the production is participating on the show. They do small roles and appearances, which the cast must find very funny. They must have a lot of inside jokes and fun with each other. Joelle must have been thrilled to make a cameo in this particular episode.

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Homelander commanding a suicidal young person to jump off a roof seems like a flipped parody of a moment from Grant Morrison and Frank Quietly’s “All-Star Superman” comic-book series.

In the comics, Regan, a girl, is seen jumping off a building when Superman passes by. However, he assures her that she is more capable of stopping herself from acting on her impulses than she realizes.

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In the second episode of “The Boys,” Homelander is anything but heroic. As part of his annual custom of saving a civilian, he is first intended to stop Chelsea from jumping. But when he finds out that Stormfront had died by taking his own life on the day that Vought had given him a birthday present, he abandons the strategy and orders Chelsea to jump.

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Homelander’s “only man in the sky” comment is a callback to the comics.

“Oh, God, oh God”, says a horrified Chelsea as she approaches the building’s edge. AS a result, Homelander responds with “No, no, no. No God. I am the only man in the sky.” The title of the episode was also influenced by that line. Homelander uttered the same phrase in volume seven, issue number 47 of the comics, but the setting was slightly different.

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At a Believe event, a family by the name of the Mullers won the top prize of supper with Homelander. Homelander informed the family that Believe is a con as he dropped a car, killing them.

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In episode two, Kimiko holds an origami figure of a mouse, a reminder of her brother Kenji.

Kimiko (Karen Fukuhara) called Kenji (Abraham Lim), who was killed by Stormfront in season two, episode three, by the moniker “Mouse.” The Female was known as Kimiko Miyashiro and grew up with her parents and brother Kenji on the coast of Japan. Kimiko adoringly remembers looking at palm trees in the moonlight from her home country.

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The Shining Light Liberation Army militants broke into her home one night and killed her parents. Kimiko and her brother were taken captive by the troops, who made them spend many years fighting in the war-torn Philippines. Kimiko manages to escape to the US.

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Gunpowder’s license plate is 2A4EVER.

This is a tribute to Sean Patrick Flanery’s character Gunpowder’s fervent defense of the Second Amendment. It reads: A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. In other words, the Second Amendment protects an individual’s right to possess a firearm unconnected with service in a militia, and to use that arm for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home.

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Gunpowder believes that if Bob Singer is elected, “in every classroom around the country, they’re gonna teach your kids to hate America, the Constitution and the Second Amendment.”

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Episode three’s title, “Barbary Coast,” is taken from volume nine of the comics.

The plot of the comics occurred in issues 52 and 53. Hughie’s first encounter with Mallory and his learning more about the actual events of World War II were the main plot points. The episode’s title is appropriate given that the titular crew visits Grace Mallory (Laila Robins) to learn the truth about what transpired in Nicaragua.

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Sometime around 1984, Mallory participated in Operation Charly, an off-the-books project by President Reagan to help the Contra rebels fight the Russian-backed Sandinistas in Nicaragua. Grace was in charge of trafficking cocaine into the US and selling the money gained to buy weapons.

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Mother’s Milk telling Frenchie to “police your shit” is a nod to the comics.

In the third episode, Mother’s Milk advises Frenchie to be respectful because the building is historic.

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When the Boys arrived at their Flatiron headquarters in volume one of the comics, he said the same thing. The steel-framed building is located at 175 Fifth Avenue in the Flatiron District neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan, New York City. It was one of the tallest buildings in the city upon its 1902 completion.

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The name on the doors of the Boys’ HQ — Grewal & Co. — is a nod to the show’s late production designer Arv Grewal.

Arvinder “Arv” Grewal passed away in October 2020 while creating the sets for “The Boys” season two. There was no known direct cause of death. Grewal was expected to begin work on the show’s third season shortly.

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He also worked with Kripke on the pilot episode of Timeless. The production designer worked on nearly three-dozen productions throughout his career either as production designer or art director. Rest In Peace, Arv.

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A-Train/Reggie’s brother Nathan wears a jacket in support of the Southview Roadrunners.

This is a tribute to the show’s creator Eric Kripke, who attended Southview High School and graduated in 1992. The mascot is the same as the one at Kripke’s Toledo junior high. Together with buddies, Kripke frequently produced home videos to present to other friends.

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John Bellairs was a major influence on his art. He went to Southern California University. He later became a writer and a television producer.

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Young Gunpowder in the episode three flashbacks is portrayed by Gattlin Griffith, who played Jesse Turner in “Supernatural.”

Gattlin Griffith as Jesse Turner in “Supernatural” is shown on the left. Griffith in the third season of “The Boys,” as a young Gunpowder. Gunpowder was a young supe in the late 1970s and early 1980s who dreamed of being famous.

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When he was selected to be Soldier Boy’s sidekick and a member of the super team Payback at the age of 14, he finally received his big break.

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After Butcher lashes out at Ryan in episode three, the boy angrily yanks off his chain and throws it to the ground.

After Becca (Shantel VanSanten) passed away in the season two finale, Butcher handed Ryan that St. Christopher necklace. Butcher informed Ryan that it belonged to Becca and that she had given it to him in the past, promising to keep him safe.

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Ryan Butcher’s mother Rebecca “Becca” Butcher was Billy Butcher’s wife. She had been employed at Vought International for several years when, on January 24, 2012, she abruptly vanished.

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Katia Winter makes her first appearance as Little Nina, a character from the comics, in episode three.

In the series, Frenchie used to work for Nina, a nasty drug trafficker. She first appears in the comics in volume two and is depicted as a diminutive woman with a bowl cut. He once receives a call from Cherie, an old friend, asking for help in escaping Nina.

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But Nina finds him and makes a deal with him to continue working with her in exchange for her turning in Cherie. He declines.

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Episode four’s title comes from volume two of the comics.

The Boys visit Moscow, Russia, as part of the “Glorious Five Year Plan” plot, and they look into LIttle Nina’s coup. The team travels to Russia in episode four of the show in pursuit of a weapon potent enough to defeat Homelander.

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Cherie’s debt to Nina is paid off by Butcher, plus an additional $100,000 as compensation. Nina is fascinated by their idea but still wants Cherie back.

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Starlight asking Maeve if she really cares that little about herself is reminiscent of a similar conversation between Dean and Sam Winchester in “Supernatural.”

Queen Maeve revealed to Starlight in episode four that she has been preparing for months in order to combat Homelander. She also claims that, because she thinks she deserved it, she doesn’t care if she dies. She says she has got it coming.

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On Kripke’s popular television program “Supernatural,” which is currently in its third season, episode 10, Sam and Dean had a dialogue that was comparable to the other one.

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Stan calling Homelander “bad product” is a nod to the source material.

Stan claims to Homelander that he’ll regret stepping down as the CEO of Vought because the public will see how miserable he is. Homelander tells the supreme that he’s merely a “terrible product,” not a divinity, to further shatter his already fragile ego.

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When Vought executive James Stillwell referred to a new super team as “poor product” in volume 23, issue 72 of the comics, it was a similar situation.

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Jamie the hamster from the comics pops up in the Russian lab, but he’s a bit different.

After Hughie kills Blarney Cock, a supe from the Teenage Kix, the Boys first come across the hamster in the comics. Hughie saved the animal after it rammed up the supe’s butt. He changed his name from Herbie to Jamie.

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The Boys see Jamie, a seemingly unimportant hamster, in a lab chamber in episode four. They discover the hamster has powers when it escapes since it was given compound V.

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In the lab, Hughie recreates his first murder from the comics.

When guards barge in, Hughie uses his newfound strength and teleportation ability thanks to the V24 in his system to save the Boys. He accidentally kills the first guard by punching his fist through his chest as he is fighting. In the comics, Blarney Cock was fatally killed by Hughie in a similar manner.

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Hughie has extraordinary strength compared to ordinary people, yet it probably still falls short of Homelander’s.

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After Soldier Boy emits a blast that hits Kimiko, she gets injured by a piece of rebar.

Kimiko ultimately survives, but in the series finale of “Supernatural” that aired in November 2020, a piece of rebar is what killed Ackles’ character while on a hunt with his brother. Kripke claimed that there are “Supernatural” Easter eggs in sequences starring Ackles.

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Given the number of people that were a part of the “The Boys” and “Supernatural” creative teams, the showrunner claimed that this outcome was only expected.

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The title of episode five — “The Last Time to Look on This World of Lies” — is taken from the comics.

The same title was used for volume 10, issue four of the comics, which was a six-issue mini-series about Butcher’s origin story.

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Billy Butcher, a former member of the British special forces who is now a vigilante, is both endearing and crafty. His only goal in life is to eliminate superheroes. But his animosity for one particular supe, Homelander, is what fuels this personal grudge. He wants revenge against him.

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When Mother’s Milk looks at old footage of Soldier Boy being experimented on, the Russian notes that “due to the procedure dated January 24, the subject still registers high radiation levels.”

Those who have followed Eric Kripke’s career are aware that his wife Deanna Kripke, “Supernatural” stars Dean Winchester and Jessica Moore, and “Timeless” lead Lucy Preston all celebrate their birthdays on January 24.

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Kripke was raised in the Toledo, Ohio, suburb Sylvania Township and earned a diploma from Sylvania Southview High School in 1992. He went to Southern California University. John Bellairs was a major influence on his art.

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Hughie giving Annie bars of Almond Joy, Charleston Chew, and Bit-O-Honey is a callback to a moment from season two.

After Supersonic dies, Hughie offers Annie the sweets along with White Claws and bath bombs.He wanted to console her.

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Hughie met Annie to assist her with a “vending machine dilemma” while they were traveling together with Mother’s Milk in season two, episode four. She named Almond Joy, Charleston Chew, and Bit-O-Honey as her three favorite candy bars. Hughie responded by labeling them “the three worst candy bars in candy history.”

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Butcher tells Queen Maeve that because of temporary V, he was able to kill a supe in less than a New York minute.

He informs Queen Maeve at the Boys HQ that he has tried all kinds of narcotics, but nothing compares to V-24. To bring down a supe “used to involve months of leg work,” he recalls. “Gunpowder… not even a New York minute.”

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It’s unclear whether Butcher’s usage of the term was an allusion to 2004 comedy “New York Minute,” starring “Supernatural” actor Jared Padalecki, or whether it was really a coincidence.

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Nina giving Frenchie chocolate limes for Kimiko “when she wakes up” is inspired by a similar moment from the comics.

Kimiko is hospitalized in the series after being attacked by Soldier Boy. Frenchie received the same care as The Female while he was put in a coma in volume six, issue 34 of the comic books.

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Chocolate limes are a smooth milk chocolate center with a crisp lime outer shell. It is a popular and classic candy. Little Nina is feared by her enemies as well as her followers.

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In another nod to “Supernatural,” when Soldier Boy arrives in present-day NYC, he glances at a poster of presidential candidate Robert Singer.

In addition to Robert “Dakota Bob” Shaefer from the comic books, there’s Bobby Singer; a character in “Supernatural” who was also from South Dakota. He served as Sam and Dean’s mentor and hunter in “Supernatural.” Jim Beaver, the actor, plays both roles.

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Bob Singer is a Democrat who is running for president. He is heavily criticized by Gunpowder, who thinks he intends to take away the right to have firearms.

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Paul Reiser guest-stars in episode five as the comic-book character The Legend.

Before Madelyn took charge at Vought in the show, the Legend served as the vice president of hero management. Stan Lee served as the model for the Legend in the comics.

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The second book contains the character’s debut. He used to write comic books for Vought-American, fabricating stories about the corrupt officials in order to defend them in the eyes of the public. He has a prosthetic leg in both iterations.

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Episode five features a shot of Mother’s Milk, Butcher, and Hughie looking into a car trunk — a familiar shot used in “Supernatural.”

The similar shot was utilized in “The Boys,” episode two of season one, when Butcher showed Frenchie a captured Translucent by opening a car trunk.

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This camera perspective was also employed in “Supernatural,” in the first episode’s last scene, in which Sam warned Dean, “We got work to do,” a line that would later appear frequently in the program. The trunk shot has also appeared in movies like Pulp Fiction.

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“The Boys” co creator and executive producer Seth Rogen returns for another cameo.

He shows up on Crimson Countess’ OnlyFans page in episode five of season three. Seth Rogen previously made an appearance in episode six of season one, where he talked about his experience making a movie with Black Noir (Nathan Mitchell).

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He made a comeback in the second season’s opening episode when discussing the superhero Translucent (Alex Hassell). Rogen is an executive producer on The Boys along with collaborator Evan Goldberg.

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The scene of Homelander talking to himself in a mirror in episode six is inspired by a moment from the comics.

Homelander expresses concern that he won’t be able to control Soldier Boy. Homelander ultimately acknowledges to himself that he desires the love of others.

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His mirror self claims that he acts in this way because, at his core, he still yearns for acceptance and affection as a human being would. In issue nine of volume 49 of the comics, Homelander underwent a similar conversion and was forced to face the truth.

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Love Sausage returns at Herogasm.

The Supreme welcomes Annie and Mother’s Milk at the door and invites them inside to celebrate Herogasm’s 70th anniversary. In season two, episode six of “The Boys,” Love Sausage was last seen strangling Mother’s Milk with his protruding private parts at Sage Grove Center.

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Because he was originally portrayed by Andrew Jackson in season two, he looks different this time. He is portrayed by Derek Johns in this season.

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“The Boys” showrunner Eric Kripke has a voice cameo at Herogasm.

An off-camera man exclaims, “throwing ropes!” as Mother’s Milk opens a door in quest of a location to get cleaned up. He yells, “Lick it up, you wonderful brown bear,” after Mother’s Milk is covered with more unpleasant liquids.

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Herogasm is a Vought-sponsored event in The Boys. The company uses it to allow their stable of superpowered celebrities to let off some steam in the depraved and impossible ways.

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After insulting Homelander’s cape, Soldier Boy uses it against him during their fight.

Homelander claims that he idolized Soldier Boy growing up because he was “the only one that was nearly as strong as me” when the two supes met off at Herogasm.

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He tried to humiliate Soldier Boy and he went ahead and told him, unperturbed: “You think you look strong, buddy? You have a cape on.” Soldier Boy pulled Homelander’s cape during the ensuing struggle, knocking him down and beating him.